DIVERSITY THROUGH 21ST CENTURY TEACHING AND LEARNING

There is a broad range of experiences brought to the school every day by cultural, linguistic, and ethnically diverse students. These unique diversities compel the development and use of different teaching strategies to target each student as an individual. In this discussion, you will explore the concept of supporting diversity through 21st century teaching and learning. This discussion is also intended to support your performance on the Week One Assignment.

Initial Post – Select three of the five prompts below, and then discuss how the Framework for 21st Century Learning (Links to an external site.) can be applied to each prompt using specific examples of the actions you would take to apply the framework. Your response to each of the three selected prompts should be one paragraph.

  • Analyze      how you can maintain high standards and demonstrate high expectations for      all ethnically, culturally, and linguistically diverse students in the      classroom.
  • Reflect      on ways in which you will choose culturally relevant curriculum and      instructional materials that recognize, incorporate, and reflect students’      heritage and the contributions of various ethnic groups.
  • Discuss      how you would differentiate instruction for the inclusion of various      learning styles.
  • Reflect      on ways in which you would modify instruction for special education      students.
  • Discuss      how you would modify instruction to meet the needs of students who are      designated second language learners.

Week 1 Discussion 1 Diversity through 21st Century Teaching and Learning

There is a broad range of experiences brought to the school every day by cultural, linguistic, and ethnically diverse students. These unique diversities compel the development and use of different teaching strategies to target each student as an individual. In this discussion, you will explore the concept of supporting diversity through 21st century teaching and learning. This discussion is also intended to support your performance on the Week One Assignment.

Initial Post – Select three of the five prompts below, and then discuss how the Framework for 21st Century Learning (Links to an external site.) can be applied to each prompt using specific examples of the actions you would take to apply the framework. Your response to each of the three selected prompts should be one paragraph.

· Analyze how you can maintain high standards and demonstrate high expectations for all ethnically, culturally, and linguistically diverse students in the classroom.

· Reflect on ways in which you will choose culturally relevant curriculum and instructional materials that recognize, incorporate, and reflect students’ heritage and the contributions of various ethnic groups.

· Discuss how you would differentiate instruction for the inclusion of various learning styles.

· Reflect on ways in which you would modify instruction for special education students.

· Discuss how you would modify instruction to meet the needs of students who are designated second language learners.

Guided Response: Respond to at least two peers. Ask questions of your peers about their responses to encourage further conversation. In your responses, consider including a question about the inclusion of 21st century skills in a diverse classroom. Though two replies is the basic expectation, for deeper engagement and learning, you are encouraged to provide responses to any comments or questions others have given to you, including the instructor.

Responding to the replies given to you will further the conversation and provide additional opportunities for you to demonstrate your content expertise, critical thinking, and real-world experiences with this topic.

Welcome to your Culminating Project

 

Learning Outcomes

This week students will:

1. Analyze how teacher knowledge of the diverse learning styles and needs of students promotes student learning and growth and how such knowledge can be attained.

2. Reflect on how 21st-century skills promote rigorous instructional and learning opportunities resulting in the learner’s cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and/or physical development.

3. Redesign a prior activity that includes challenging learning experiences promoting cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional and/or physical development.

4. Reflect on design and implementation challenges experienced during the redesign of a prior activity demonstrating attainment of program learning outcomes.

5. Redesign a prior activity that demonstrates attainment of program learning outcomes by incorporating differentiated instructional strategies to address 21st-century skills that consider the diverse strengths, differences, cultures, and communities of students while offering a safe, collaborative, engaging, and inclusive learning environment.

 

Introduction

Week One requires you to review the Framework for 21st Century Learning (Links to an external site.) as it relates to skills in the classroom that promote rigorous instructional and learning opportunities for learner development cognitively, linguistically, socially, emotionally, and/or physically. The assignment for this week is one of a series of redesign activities you will complete in this course. This week’s redesign activity could be from a lesson plan or teaching unit in which you show representation of 21st-century learning through incorporation of student outcomes and support systems. You will access the Framework for 21st Century Learning (Links to an external site.) website as a primary source for Week One to review student outcomes and support systems in defense of your choice of the most appropriate artifact from your prior coursework for redesign. Additionally, Week One involves the use of digital tools for communication, reflection, storage, and sharing the work you develop, such as when you set up your Folio  (Links to an external site.)and create your introduction for the course.

Go to top of page

 

Required Resources

Text

Burnaford, G., & Brown, T. (2014). Teaching and learning in 21st century learning environments: A reader . Retrieved from https://content.ashford.edu/

· Chapter 2: Meeting the Instructional Needs of Diverse Learners

Web Page

Framework for 21st century learning.  (Links to an external site.)(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.p21.org/our-work/p21-framework

· This web page provides a comprehensive review of 21st-century teaching and learning and combines a focus on student outcomes with support systems that help students’ master skills they will need in the 21st century. This resource will support student completion of the discussion and assignment for this week. Accessibility Statement does not exist. Privacy Policy does not exist.

Website

Folio. (https://ashford.instructure.com/users/893/external_tools/2653)

· This website provides a Folio resource. This resource will support student completion of the final project, as well as discussions and assignments throughout the course. Accessibility Statement does not exist Privacy Policy

Recommended Resources

Articles

Jackson, N., Bolden, W. S., Fenwick, L. T., & Southern Education Foundation, A. A. (2001). Patterns of excellence: Promoting quality in teaching through diversity (Links to an external site.)Policy Perspectives on Diversity Training and School Leadership.

· This collection of papers includes descriptions of university programs that are representations of minority teacher recruitment and preparation. This resource will support student completion of the discussion and assignment for this week.

Kwok, J. (2009). Boys and reading: An action research project reportLibrary Media Connection, (4). 20. Retrieved from the EBSCOhost database.

· A personal narrative is presented in this resource, which explores the author’s experience of conducting an action research project on boys and literacy in a third-grade classroom in a New York public school. This resource will support student completion of the discussion and assignment for this week. The full-text version of this article is available through the EBSCOhost database in the Ashford University Library.

Waters, F. H., Smeaton, P. S., & Burns, T. G. (2004). Action research in the secondary science classroom: Student response to differentiated, alternative assessmentAmerican Secondary Education, 32(3), 89-104. Retrieved from the EBSCOhost database.

· In this article, Waters, Smeaton, and Burns discuss how an interdisciplinary team of 16 faculty designed a research-based, comprehensive classroom assessment model that provided professors with a framework for making informed choices about assessing student learning. This resource will support student completion of the discussion and assignment for this week. The full-text version of this article is available through the EBSCOhost database in the Ashford University Library.

EDU696

Week One Instructor Guidance

A warm welcome to EDU696: Capstone 2: Culminating Project! During this class you will use an electronic portfolio (i.e., ePortfolio) known as Folio to create a collection of your coursework that will demonstrates your mastery of the program learning outcomes (PLOs) in either the MACI, MAECEL, MAED, MATLT or MASE program. The collection of coursework, also known as artifacts, is redesigned or modified prior coursework that aligns to one or more of the PLOs. The redesigns focus on your application of the principles of 21st Century Learning. Review the Syllabus in our course for a complete Course Description and an overview of the Course Design of this course.

You are now viewing the Week One Instructor Guidance. Each week the Instructor Guidance provides you with insights about the topics for the week and guidance for completing the discussions and assignments. These insights go beyond the introduction for the week provided with the weekly homepage (where the Learning Outcomes for the week and assessment instructions are listed).

Each weekly Instructor Guidance provides an overview of the assessments for the week followed by intellectual elaboration on the topic(s) for the week. The resources and references provided with the guidance are intended to further support you in the assessments in EDU696. It is strongly recommended you plan for at least one hour of study time each week to review the guidance in addition to the hours you will dedicate to required readings for the course and completion of the assessments. Each week, if you need additional guidance for completing the assessments in our course, do not hesitate to contact your instructor. You can also reach out to class peers using the Ashford Café.

21st Century Teaching and Learning

It will help if before we discuss diversity, you reflect on your knowledge about 21st Century Teaching and Learning skills. Although Week One focuses on 21st Century Skills, the other significant focus is on diversity in the school context. The overarching question for the week is: How do we apply these 21st Century Teaching and Learning Skills to assist diverse students?

After viewing the two videos recommended below, you will explain how 21st Century Teaching and Learning skills are applicable to both teacher and student. While watching the videos, ask yourself what you already use in the classroom to support 21st Century Teaching and Learning and what more you could do to ensure students are obtaining the skills they need for future learning.

Review this video from Teknolojileri  (Links to an external site.)(2013) discussing 21st Century Skills in approximately two minutes. Specifically, Teknolojileri discusses the skills of creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, media literacy, information literacy, and problem solving for students, which are a part of the 21st Century Teaching and Learning plan. Next, review this approximately three minute video from Knowledge Delivery Systems (Links to an external site.) (2013) that explores the fundamentals of 21st Century Skills and what they mean to the practice of educators.

Diversity and Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

The contemporary classroom requires teachers to educate students from a variety of backgrounds, including culture, language, and learning abilities (Gollnick & Chinn, 2002). Therefore, as these increasing numbers of students from diverse backgrounds populate 21st century classrooms in the United States, the need for pedagogical appropriate lessons that are also culturally responsive is magnified.

Culturally responsive and pedagogically-appropriate lessons are important to create because when diverse students come together in a classroom, students’ thoughts expressed verbally, graphically or in writing reveal a wealth of information about each student’s thinking. Furthermore, through exposure to the diversity of classmates, students tend to expand their thinking skills and move away from linear thinking patterns toward thinking about their world and their learning outside of their culture and previous education experiences.

On this point, view the George (Links to an external site.) (2011) video, which is about three minutes in length, discussing how innovation occurs when diverse minds collaborate. As you watch the video, think about 21st Century Teaching and Learning and consider: How has the school shown in the video, incorporated 21 Century Teaching and Learning to include diversity in the classroom and school? Consider sharing your thoughts on the video as part of your discussions responses this week or start a conversation in our Ashford Café!

  When teachers are aware of diversity in the classroom and are culturally responsive, while incorporating 21st Century Skills into everyday curriculum, it creates a more effective and supporting learning environment for all students

Next, consider how diversity, as it relates to balanced achievement, is a primary goal of every school. Yet, recall that diversity is only one aspect of a complex phenomenon. If we dive deeper into our learning of diversity, you will remember that culturally responsible pedagogy is a deeper aspect of learning and teaching with diverse student populations.

Lynch (2011) describes culturally responsive pedagogy as a style of teaching that facilitates and supports the achievement of all students. In a culturally responsive classroom, effective teaching and learning occur in a culturally supported, learner-centered context, whereby the strengths students bring to school are identified, nurtured, and utilized to promote student achievement (Lynch, 2011, para. 3).

Culturally responsive pedagogy comprises of three dimensions: (a) institutional, (b) personal, and (c) instructional. The institutional dimension reflects the administration and its policies and values. The personal and instructional dimension refers to the cognitive and emotional processes teachers must engage in to become culturally responsive (Ladson-Billings, 2012, p.65).

In the Educating Diverse Students in the 21st Century chapter of the course textbook, Brown and Burnaford (2014) present information about the role of diversity in the classroom and 21st Century Skills. For example, in the article by Kozol (2012), the discussion centers on the issue of the US movement to privatize K-12 education which Kozol notes “that this disingenuous approach [may] distract from the public responsibility to ensure high quality education for all children” (p. 6). Kozol’s point is significant as the issue of schools of choice movement sweeps across the United States and how it affects Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and 21st Century Skills in schools where the demographics may be skewed to have higher academic gains than other non-charter schools. In the article by Gay (2003), she points out that “… multicultural education is more essential than ever, given the increasing number of immigrants from non-European countries” (p. 17). Furthermore, Gay argues that “…this approach is necessary to ensure that all students are prepared for academic success, and for participation in a democratic and pluralistic society” (p.17). Finally, in the article by Reardon (2013), societal inequalities between race and income levels are discussed.

Writing Rituals – An Overview

While this course focuses in on Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and 21st Century Skills, the writing process cannot be ignored! For this reason, in Week One, information regarding writing rituals is included.

Once the skill of the learned few, writing is now recognized as a part of a basic education in the United States. The close connection between writing and reading (writers need readers) makes writing an even more valuable skill. Additionally, in an online classroom where much of the communication is textual, reading and writing are key academic skills to hone for success, which you have no doubt noticed throughout your master’s program!

There are many similarities in the process used by individuals to write, but there are infinite nuances within these similarities. Humans are creatures of habit and among these habits are our rituals. In its broadest sense, a ritual is a set pattern of default behavior that people turn to, often unconsciously, in key situations. The ritual is often first developed by noting and observing others, and then it is individually modified to suit individual needs. What is informative about rituals is they are very ingrained in our behavior and disrupting the ritual can disrupt our actions and even diminish the meaning of the ritual. This is true in many types of rituals, including writing.

Writing Rituals—Environment, Time, and Behavior

Observationally speaking, writing rituals can take many forms, but according to one study, there appear to be three key elements in creating a writing ritual (O’Shaughnessy, McDonald, Maher, & Dobie, 2002). They are environment, time, and behavior.  

Environment includes, but is not limited to, where a writer writes, clean or cluttered, music or no music, pencils/pens/computers, etc. This set of environmental factors matter—if they are right, the writer can work productively. If not, the environment serves as a distracter. When considering time, many serious writers have a set time each day to conduct their writing. This is often early or late in the day, but can really be any time that works for the individual writer. Churchill, for example, who made his living in part as a free-lance journalist, did much of his writing late in the evening. What is (nearly) certain about this is that the time of day that writing is done is very important, and seldom deviated from. Regarding behavior, O’Shaughnessy, McDonald, and Dobie (2002) noted that “The behaviors of the writers we surveyed can be described as rehearsed (as opposed to spontaneous), repetitious, and seemingly unrelated to the work at hand” (para. 15). These are, additionally, highly idiosyncratic, and set additional conditions so that the writer can write.

Application of Writing Rituals to Our Work

        Success Tip!

As a practical matter, we benefit from thinking about our own writing rituals and how they help (or hinder) our ability write productively. If we need background noise to be able to be productive, then we need to organize our environment to include such noise. And if we need the latest computer technology to write well, then we need to set about obtaining one. The bottom line, particularly as it concerns your work as graduate students, is to be able to organize things in the way that you can be the most productive and effective – this becomes your writing ritual and following it can lead to success.

Week One Assessments Overview

In Week One, we review the Framework for 21st Century Learning by redesigning an activity that represents 21st Century Learning through incorporation of Student Outcomes and Support Systems. Additionally, we explore and use the Folio system.

Refer to the rubrics in the course to understand how you will be evaluated for assignments and discussions. In the assignment rubrics, notice there are specific criterion and performances listed ranging from distinguished to nonperformance. Your goal is to achieve the distinguished level of performance for each criterion. Use the rubrics for assignments in conjunction with the instructions on the week homepage to ensure you have both completed the assignment thoroughly and done so at a distinguished level. For discussions, refer to the rubric for discussions taking note of the expectations for quality of your responses. If you have questions about the discussion rubric for this course, contact your instructor right away!

Discussion: Post Your Introduction

In this discussion, we begin to build our initial classroom community together. Although many of you may be acquainted from prior courses, this course is our unique opportunity to learn together around the topics of this course! Through interactions with your class peers and the instructor in each course, you have opportunities to learn from a unique group of individuals with vast and varied levels of background expertise in the field of education. Take full advantage of these opportunities and get to know your peers and instructors as much as possible to promote more meaningful interactions during the course and beyond! In the discussion you will create your Folio.

For the Post Your Introduction discussion, there are three parts. In part one you will introduce yourself and state which program you align. In part two you will sign up for a Folio account for use as an ePortfolio throughout this course. The ePortfolio will be used in this course for all assignments and some discussion postings. You may have already created the ePortfolio in Folio for a prior course. Contact your instructor with questions about how to repurpose your existing Folio portfolio for the EDU696 Capstone requirements. Part three is your reflection on the ePortfolio set up and discussion on future practices using the ePortfolio.

Discussion: Diversity Through 21st Century Teaching and Learning

In this discussion, you explore the concept of supporting diversity through 21st Century Teaching and Learning. This discussion supports you in completing the Week One Assignment, which focuses on Student Outcomes and Support Systems in relation to diversity. Consider all aspects of 21st Century Teaching and Learning for this discussion and how they can be applied to diverse learners. For example; if you had learners who were in a gifted program how could you differentiate instruction to ensure critical thinking and problem solving were incorporated at higher levels of cognition? Keep in mind that higher level thinking does not mean having more work or even difficult work incorporated into the lesson. Instead, student tasks and assessments should include cognitive processes with rigor and complexity. Depth of Knowledge (Webb, 1997) and Bloom’s Taxonomy (1956, 2001) both support an alignment between expected level of cognition and the expectation demanded by standards, curricular activities and assessment tasks to determine mastery (Hess, Carlock, Jones, & Walkup, 2009).

Assignment: Supporting Diversity Through 21st Century Teaching and Learning

This assignment re-introduces you to the framework of 21st Century Skills. Each week you will redesign an activity and reflect upon the challenges associated with the redesign and development. Consider in this assignment how the components you have chosen to incorporate from 21st Century Student Outcomes: Core Subjects and 21st Century Themes, Learning and Innovation Skills, Information, Media, and Technology Skills, and Life and Career Skills can be reflected in the lesson plan or teaching unit redesign. Think about how the use of 21st Century skills are a foundation for higher thinking skills, discuss how you can ensure students achieve more in depth learning from a lesson which is above and beyond rote memory and based on the foundations provided in the 21st Century skills each student needs to know.

 

References

Brown, T. & Burnaford, G. (2014). Masters in education capstone reader. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.

Gay, G. 2003. The importance of multicultural education. Educational Leadership, 61(4), 30-35.

George, J. ( 2011, May 11). Innovation through diversity (Links to an external site.) [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjrjiSecZv0&feature=youtu.be

Gollnick, D., & Chinn, P. (2002). Multicultural education in a pluralistic society. NJ: Pearson.

Hess, K., Carlock, D., Jones, B., & Walkup, J. (2009). What exactly do “fewer, clearer, and higher standards” really look like n the classroom? Using a cognitive rigor matrix to analyze curriculum, plan lessons, and implement assessments (Links to an external site.). Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320536235_What_exactly_do_fewer_clearer_and_higher_standards_really_look_like_in_the_classroom_Using_a_cognitive_rigor_matrix_to_analyze_curriculum_plan_lessons_and_implement_assessments

Knowledge Delivery Systems (2013, June 5). 21st century skills: Rethinking how students learn (Links to an external site.) . [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMG5dvhEzyo

Kozol, J. 2012. Savage inequalities: Children in America’s schools (Reprint ed.). Portland, OR: Broadway Books.

Ladson-Billings, G. (2012). The dreamkeepers. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Lynch, M. (2011, December). What is cultural responsive pedagogy?  (Links to an external site.) Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matthew-lynch-edd/culturally-responsive-pedagogy_b_1147364.html

O’Shaughnessy, K., McDonald, C., Maher, H., and Dobie, A. (2002, Fall). Who, what, when, and where of writing rituals. The Quarterly 24 (4), 18-22; 36.

Reardon, S. F. (2013). “The widening income achievement gap.” Educational Leadership (8): 10-16.

Teknolojileri, B. (2013, May). 21st century skills (Links to an external site.) [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwJIhZcAd0I

Additional Resources

Lichtman, G. (March, 2013). What 60 schools can tell us about teaching 21st century skills Ted x (Links to an external site.) [Video File]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZEZTyxSl3g

Hollis, J. (1995). Sample action research report 1: Effect of technology in enthusiasm for learning science (Links to an external site.) Retrieved from            http://www.sagepub.com/mertler3study/resources/reports/88896_sr1.pdf

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more

Order your paper today and save 30% with the discount code HAPPY

X
Open chat
1
You can contact our live agent via WhatsApp! Via + 1 323 412 5597

Feel free to ask questions, clarifications, or discounts available when placing an order.

Order your essay today and save 30% with the discount code HAPPY