Key Factors and Challenges of Talent Management Implementation

 

The Focus of the Study

The study will focus on the Pearson-set theme of talent management frameworks. This is due to the lack of uniformity in the theoretical management framework in global-based companies. The results of the analysis of the Pearson-set theme of talent management frameworks can be used as a path to drive talent management.

Background of The Study

Companies worldwide are working on the critical issue of attracting, developing, and retaining talent. Thus, talent management is the activity and process that fosters identification, development engagement, systematic attraction, retention, and deployment of talent that add value to the organisation’s sustainable success. Talent management is a critical component of the company’s growth. It allows the attraction of top talent, motivation of employees, ensures continuous coverage of pertinent roles, increases employee performance, and maintains client satisfaction. Given that investing in talent management enhances company growth and excellence, Pearson PLC is working on implementing these strategies (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017 p. 432). The complexities of the current business context marked by technology, globalisation, socio-economic, demographic, and geopolitical transformations further enhance the necessity to focus on recruiting, developing, attracting, and identifying talents capable of overcoming these challenges.

The recent focus on talent management orient towards strategic priority for income generation for organisations. Research reveals concerns about the theoretical development of talent management as ineffective (Sparrow, 2014). The need for talent management arises from people management practices aimed at achieving operational excellence and strategic execution. Talents are unique and central to the attainment of a sustainable competitive advantage. Therefore, for most CEOs, any talent-related issue is a concern (Sparrow et al., 2014, p. 1)Over 80% of CEOs point to the scarcity of essential skills and capability as a threat to the growth of their organisations (Sparrow et al., 2014, p. 1), hence addressing practical questions concerning talent management.

The critiques to talent management research link it to delays in achieving the organisation’s direction and vision. Yet, recently talent management is the fastest growing faculty in the management fields. Consequently, the question that arises targets what happens in practice and why. Without a doubt, insufficient knowledge on the conception, implementation, and development of talent management affects organisational outcomes. Evidence points out that talent management design and implementation are rational and critical processes from an organisational context. In a recent review, authors based their research in a broad context on conceptualisation and talent management implementation as highly neglected (Cappelli and Keller, 2014, p. 306). Therefore, there is a need for critiques to address the challenges and critical factors of the future.

Research purpose

The research purpose of the study is to develop a talent management framework for Pearson PLC. We will conduct an in-depth exploration of practices aligned with talent management in Pearson PLC compared to mature organisations on a global scale.

Rationale

The demand for talent management best practices prompt the need to develop a talent management strategy for corporate and human resource management. The formal talent management initiative should link the human resource function to that of the corporate in a vertical framework.

 Research approach, design, and method

This research project on Pearson set on the theme of talent management gathers high-quality papers to enhance understanding of implementing talent management strategies. The research paper will summarise the critical approach to talent management, implementation, and potential challenges.

Areas of study

  1. To assess the practicality of talent management in Pearson PLC
  2. To evaluate talent management implementation
  3. To assess the role of talent management implementation
  4. Research gaps and Potential challenges at Pearson talent management

 Research questions

  1. What is the practicality of managerial implication about talent management accountabilities and identify critical players for successful talent management implementation?
  2. What are the talent management’s strategic importance and suggestions on team research’s contextualisation?
  3. What is the role of talent management in Pearson PLC?
  4. What are the critical research gaps and offer recommendations on implementing talent-based management in Pearson PLC?

 

 

 

Chapter 2: Literature Review

The practical aspect of talent management implementation

First, practicality in talent management entails talent acquisition. It encompasses people management processes by assessing critical talent needs, sourcing, screening, determining performance profiles, and hiring. Besides, constant assessment of performance measures improves the recruiting function and compensation plans (Cappelli 2014, p. 15). This goes hand in hand with career management, where organisations assess the problems of performance planning, succession management, development planning, talent mobility, and leadership development (Sparrow et al., 2014). Thus, a talent management framework can integrate into different HR projects, and training helps the business leaders to achieve better decision-making skills and operate effectively.

The term talent management is broad, owing to a different approach aligning towards conceptual boundaries. The absence of clarity regarding its scope, goals, and definition has prompted researchers to conclude that talent management cannot be restricted to a definite purpose and theoretical development due to empirical evidence’s limitations (Sparrow, 2014). Different articles conceptualise talent management differently. The researcher’s constant critic in using the term talent management is discriminatively just a rebranding of the numerous HR activities (Cappelli 2014, p. 15). In the past 30 years, organisation management of its employees has become the centre of attention to market leaders and management. The concern has centred on anticipating human capital needs and working out a plan to manage it (Sparrow et al., 2014). Since traditional methods have failed to offer reasonable certainty, new approaches target external labour markets’ prominence connected with talent management. The definition consistent with conventional techniques captures academic researchers’ focus as follows; that talent management is a process under which an organisation anticipates and meets talents in strategic jobs. The definition is in line with the educational requirement to stimulate development by reflecting the practitioners’ interest.

An ideal talent management framework enables the organisation to point out skill gaps and human capital needed for goal achievement. A well-structured talent management framework increases employee satisfaction, engagement, motivation, and skill and allows them to align their personal growth to that of the company (Sparrow et al., 2014). In turn, this boosts business performance and client satisfaction.

Role and Framework Talent Management

Thus, a talent management framework helps human resources and management to develop staff potential and talent retention. This is fundamental for both the organisation and the individualised needs of the employee. Thus, talent management must be structured into performance management, recruitment, corporate learning, integrated talent management, and compensation management (Sparrow, 2014). The HR professional and top management leaders adopt a hierarchical approach to foster employee experience rather than overreliance on employee output. The leaders now focus on an environment that develops, retains, and attract the manifestation of talent. According to (Cappelli 2014, p. 15)85 % of organisation executives regard employee experience as critical in retaining talent. Further, Collings (2014) supports the idea that customer experience enhances productivity, profitability, and customer satisfaction. Krishnan (2017) explains that customer experience outcomes are only possible when a company reimagines talent through a practical talent management framework.

Pearson PLC offers educational services and products to governments, institutions, and individual learners. Therefore, to achieve its goals, the company relies on talent. Thus it emphasises processing, scoring services, teacher development, system-wide solution, and educational software. Thus, adopting an integrated framework, Pearson PLC works towards talent identification and establishing culture and service delivery competencies.

Apart from creating a local HR, Pearson targets a talent management framework that attracts the right people into the set culture.  Sparrow (2014) equates talent management to supply chain management of the human resource. The purchasing function relies on an integrated process for the acquisition and management of human capital.

The Pearson- based theme of talent management should be employee-centric to achieve exceptional candidate and employee experience. All aspects of the talent management process and the employee practice design rely on the employee experience. An employee-centric talent management’s benefits boost employee confidence that performance reviews, development plans, learning outcomes, and career discussions lead to transparent and equitable access to rewards and recognition, development opportunities, and internal mobility. Pearson relies on technology to create a practical customer experience, which is integral to support employee journey from recruitment, reward and recognition, learning, and career development to internal development (Vaiman et al., 2012).

An employee-centric approach in talent management heavily relies on culture and wellbeing. An influential organisational culture creates an enticing environment that boosts productivity and positivity that facilitates achieving the values, mission, and goals of Pearson PLC. The grounds of an employee-centric culture lie in the leadership framework of talent management. Thus, Pearson PLC needs to move beyond quotas, compliance training, and diversity to become people developers for current and future engagements (Vaiman et al., 2012). Therefore, to support wellbeing, work-life balance, and flexibility. Pearson PLC needs to exercise greater flexibility.

Further, the process of recruitment and on boarding relies on employee-centric approach incorporation in talent management. Collings (2014) categorises today’s candidate consumer-grade experience-driven. Hartmann et al. (2010) say that 15% of millennials would decline an offer based on HR tech’s absence in ten recruitment processes. The attribute of an HR tech to a seamless, hassle-free method of recruitment. Thus, Pearson PLC should adopt a two-pronged approach to create a seamless and engaging employee experience for superior outcomes. Further, consideration of an outstanding employee brand is essential in attracting viable and quality talent.  Collings (2014) agree that 80 % of employee research on the company before applying for a role, thus the Pearson PLC brand must entice the top talent.  Hartmann et al. (2010) backs up the idea that the employer brand attracts 60 of the most qualified to talent, hence reducing the cost of hire by 40%. According to Hartmann et al. (2010), employees work for an organisation whose mission, culture, values, and mission align with their personal goals and values. Thus, by Pearson creating, communicating, and showcasing value propositions, they appeal to high calibre talent (Vaiman et al., 2012). A paradigm shift from the first impression points to an employee-centric talent management employer-based brand influences corporate brand reputation.

Notably, for Pearson PLC finding and attracting talent is an ongoing process. The human resource is working towards optimisation of the recruitment process through building continuous pipelines of talent. One of the strategies is adding the high-quality unsuccessful candidate into the talent pool’s connection with qualified, pre-screened applicants for future roles, thus improving the potential employee experience (Vaiman et al., 2012). Effective on boarding is just as important as recruiting the right people. On boarding introduces new hires to the people, tools, and experiences that will help them be successful and sets the tone and expectations for what’s to come. When on boarding is a seamless continuation of the recruitment experience, it reinforces employee engagement and ensures new hires hit the ground running. It’s the first, critical step in the employee’s continuous learning journey.

Talent management implementation and Conceptualisation

Talent resonates within the organisation and can only be examined from a specified time and based on individualised perspectives (Vaiman et al., 2012). Hence, Pearson PLC needs to focus on ownership structures, work composition, and individual perceptions that influence talent management strategies. Penaloza (2014) emphasises the need for forms of conceptualisation talent from potential partners. Everyone is talent, top talent, and valued skill-based roles relevant to Pearson PLC. Thus, talent discourses can exclusively and inclusively co-exist while emphasising the need to be plastic, considering the meaning of talent, essential strategies for implementation, and adoption.

Further, Collings (2014) addresses and expands our understanding globally by targeting organisational context features effects on employees’ reaction to talent inclusion. Through the signalling theory in examining responses of talents and analyse their status in the context of a company’s strategic intention to maintain the elements of secrecy and information asymmetry in communicating talent—the evidence based on a qualitative study of a US-based multinational corporation. These reflect on the long-term positive consequences of talent communication to employees and surface at different points in the other employee groups. Therefore, Pearson PLC management practically applies contact as part of the organisational context in employees’ attitude towards talent pool inclusion for talent management. The focus is on culturally-rooted reactions that pose challenges to effectiveness and implementation, specifically talent management.

Besides, Kim, Williams, Rothwell, and Penaloza (2014) support the Conceptualisation of talent as a means of an end to talent management. Through the qualitative study model, Pearson can explore the role of professionalism in shaping employee reaction to talent management decisions and improving performance. The basis of Pearson analysis should mediate the felt obligation in the relationship between organisational citizenship behaviour and talent ratings in an environment founded on firm professions. Further, it is critical to test the role of professionalism in the moderation of talent ratings and obligation towards Pearson PLC. In comparison to Collings (2014), organisational citizenship behaviour and the felt responsibility influence an organisation’s talent ratings. Further, identity in professionalism moderated the relationship between felt obligation and ratings of potential, whereby the association is most substantial at low levels of professional identification (Vaiman et al., 2012).

Talent management implementation

Silzer (2010) draws attention to talent management as a strategic resource integration that entails strategic deployment, proactive development, identification, and strategic resource integration. Hartmann et al. (2010) agree that talent management should primarily drive the strategic response to change market conditions. The main market changes that affect talent acquisition and retaining include the technological evolution, aging of the workforce, the absence of talented workers, and trouble in enticing gifted employees. Therefore, training and development of talent management are critical for Pearson PLC success as confirmed by Collings (2014), which magnifies talent management’s ability as a drive to gain competitive advantage through development, transfer of talented employees, and identification. The goal is to ensure that Pearson PLC has staff with the required quantity and quality standards aligned with their short term and long term priorities. Hartmann et al. (2010) see talent management as a specific process that ensures that an organisation has highly qualified staff capable of achieving set goals. This can only be done by streamlining the inflow of talent and encouraging new talent for its survival. Therefore, continued learning reflects on Pearson PLC’s development processes.

Potential challenges at Pearson talent management

Even though a well-laid out framework regarding learning and training at the Pearson PLC, the human resource management team faces several challenges. Naturally, the possibility of education in practice links to career growth, but this is limited to employees with high potential for an organisation. The set back is that potentially talented employees can be left out or ignored. This is why Collings (2014) agrees that despite the need to continuously develop talent management, a significant drawback is the lack of empirical studies. During talent management, errors are inevitable as organisations lack a complex understanding and a comprehensive view of skills, ability, labour force, and efficiency.

A similar situation occurred in the Boston consulting group in 2007, where talent management was on the top five list of the challenges they encountered that year. Collings (2014) backed up the idea that technology and dynamism trends complicate the talent management process. Some of the forces influencing effective talent management include demographic changes, globalisation, demographic changes, the market, and its structure. Hartmann et al. (2010) followed up the contribution, presents a detailed analysis of the variables. The dependencies analysis of the implementation of talent activities and variables is linked to Czech organisations. In Europe, 48% perceive management’s change as a hindrance to talent growth and management, 365 attributed organisational effectiveness and unequal staffing as a critical challenge. Thus, local talent is the most preferred in company growth due to their deep understanding of culture, but this usually a challenge to most companies and a concern to leadership development.

 

 

 

 

Chapter 3: Research Methodology

The study will explore the practical aspects of talent management and explore the factors that affect talent management’s effectiveness and implementation—further the potential and actual value of talent management for organisations and talented employees.

Case Selection

The empirical data was collected in a longitudinal explorative study based on talent management policies and practices in the top four global companies. HR professionals were selected randomly. The selection process is exclusive for the HR who have previously participated in a similar survey in the past six months in the sampling frame. Participants who were students, consultants, academics, or located abroad were excluded from the sampling frame. 384 HR professionals were selected for the study. The respondents may fail to respond to some questions on the survey if the problems are not applicable or the requested data is unavailable. Like any other research, caution should be taken when generalising results. In such cases, individual circumstances and experiences are considered to ease the decision-making process based on presented data. The results presented are a true representation of the HR professional responding to the survey.

The Sampling and Procedure

The human resource policy concerning talent management was analysed via a semi-structured interview procedure through a descriptive research methodology. After that, content analyses were made for data gathered from interviews. The data collected comprises job specification model and job description, institutional support, appraisal systems, employee recognition and motivation policies, career development policies, developmental policies, and training.

Seventeen open-ended questions were raised, where the first sixteen questions were to gather information on selecting and attracting talent, talent development, retention of talent, and company loyalty. The seventeenth question concerned the personal relation specialist position. Three thousand emails were delivered 400 HR professional, and a response of 21% was yielded. The survey took four weeks, combined with four daily reminders to the sampled members. Throughout the report, the analysis of respondents’ organisational staff size, organisational sector, HR department staff size, and the existence of a talent management initiative are presented for discussion whenever applicable.

Statistical Differences

The conventional statistical methods were applied to observe the statistical difference. That is if there is a likelihood that any difference occurred by chance. Thus, in most cases, only statistically significant results were used.

The Confidence Level and Margin Error

This research project on Pearson set the theme of talent management gathers high-quality papers to enhance understanding of implementing talent management strategies. The research paper will summarise the critical approach to talent management, implementation, and potential challenges. A confidence and margin error gives readers some measure of how much the data can be relied upon. Given the survey’s level of response, the confidence level was at 95%, with a margin of error of about 5%.

 

 

 

Chapter 4: Findings

The results based on Sparrow et al. (2014) reveal that in this case, 52% of the HR professionals reported that their organisations had specific talent management strategies. With a margin of error of 5%, it is 95% certain that 47%to %& per cent of the HR members will report that their organisation has talent management activities ongoing.

Over one and a half of the HR professionals in their respective organisations recorded that talent management activities are ongoing. Among the respondents, over three quarters indicated that talent management is a top priority in their organisation. Based on the feedback, the critical areas of improvement involved the for the organisation creating a culture that will retain employees more, talent programs aimed at building a reservoir of a successor at entry-level, identification of gaps in candidate competency level and current employee and creating policies that enhance career growth and development opportunities (Sparrow et al., 2014).

The areas that require less improvement based on the respective HR response were creating a culture that valued employees at their workplace and enticed individuals to join their organisation and create a culture where individuals feel heard and valued. Among the top organisation with well laid out specific talent management in place, over a third of the respondents indicated that the HR professional worked in close contact with the manager’s talent management initiative. The respondents from an organisation with well laid out structures for talent management in place were highly likely to rate their organisation positively regarding planning, development opportunities, reward management, professional advancement, workplace culture planning, and retention than those organisations without talent management plans in place (Sparrow et al., 2014). The HR professionals from organisations with laid out structures for talent management in place were highly likely to plan for mid-level and junior level leadership positions. Also, organisations with talent management strategies were highly likely to undertake initiatives to have a formal budget for recruiting individuals, retaining employees, and developing employees.

The respondents reported that their organisation had specific talent management initiatives, despite the organisational size and the top priority initiatives. However, over large organisations with a capacity of 500 employees the organisation was highly likely than smaller with less than 100 employees and medium-sized with less than 500 employees indicated talent management as the top priority as 90% for large companies, 75 % for medium companies, and 69% for small companies.

The difference was caused by organisations having the financial capacity and resources to employ, equip, and implement talent management strategies compared to small and medium companies. Talent management aids the management to improve on recruitment, development, retention and aligning the processes to the set business strategy (Sparrow et al., 2014). The process will target individuals with the aptitude and skills required for the current and future organisational needs.

The HR professionals from organisations with talent management plans were asked to state who is within their organisation to recruit, develop, and retain easily. In that case, the hr professions were responsible for recruiting, developing, and retention of employees. This is in line with the duties stipulated for the HR in an organisation as they usually have an indirect role in dealing with employees that enter the organisation. Over 85 % of the HR indicated that they work directly with managers and employees to implement and manage initiatives (Sparrow et al., 2014). These results are also in line with HR’s duties and responsibilities to facilitate the organisation’s processes.

Professionals whose organisation had talent management capabilities were asked to indicate the top areas in which the organisation needed to improve talent management practice. Respondent reported that building a more bottomless reservoir for successors was at 28% and needed improvements. They were followed by 17% of the respondents who indicated that they needed culture to stay in an organisation. Also, 17% identified the gap between the candidate and the current employee as an area that required improvement (Sparrow et al., 2014). Also, 16 % of the respondents were more interested in improving the culture that values work.

Seven per cent of the respondents desire to join organisations that create an environment where employees are heard and valued. Overall, substantial HR professionals indicated that they felt a need to improve areas that fostered talent management through an integrated well thought out talent management practice (Sparrow et al., 2014). Talent management practice covered developmental opportunities, professional advancement, recruitment retention planning, workplace culture, and reward management.

As indicated earlier, respondents from organisations with talent management initiatives were significantly more likely to respond than respondents from an organisation that lacked a framework for talent management. The ratings for companies with well-set policies was at 2005 and those without were at 5%. There was a large variance between the groups, and the median was expected to increase by 20% (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017).

Developing employees is critical for employees who are well trained for specific roles from the start of working in an organisation to the point that skill sets are designed to meet regular and dynamic organisational needs. Organisational that gives employees the chance to increase their skills and expand their abilities to retain talent and growth (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017). The organisation must communicate to their employees on their future and career within the organisation and have a system that specifically tells employees will need success. One indication that organisation serious about developing employees is the presence of a formal budget for development and training, sixty per cent of the organisation respondent s reported using the formal budget for developing employees, 65% of the respondents were in organisations with talent initiatives, while 54% were from the organisation without the talent initiatives indicated that their budgets were to experience a marked increase in the next two years. The percentage increase ranged from 3% to 200% for organisations with initiatives as compared with 5% to 200% for companies without talent management initiatives (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017).

The slight variation was in the median values, where 20% of organisations without talent initiatives and 25% of organisations with talent initiatives. The biggest management concern was retaining employees with potential labour shortages due to the aging workforce and increased skilled labour scarcity.

 

 

Chapter 5: Discussion

Organisations in this current world face increasing demands to advance, retain, acquire, and grow from ground level potentially high and high-performing talent. The prospect of increasing retiring baby boomers and escalating competitiveness from a global workforce is a challenge. Organisations such as Yahoo Inc. Are embracing corporate strategies for talent management (Schuler et al., 2011). An organisation’s success lies in its talent availability and accessible resources of the organisations (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017). This survey’s findings reveal that most organisations rely on specific management strategies to be in place.

Talent discourses can inclusively and exclusively co-exist upon essential strategies to implement viable talent management strategies (Vaiman et al., 2012). Based on evidence from us-based multinational companies, the results reflected the long-term positive consequences of talent communication to employees and surface at different points in the other employee groups. The results also revealed the ratings associated with organisational citizenship behaviour and the felt responsibility between organisational citizenship behaviour and talent ratings (Sparrow et al., 2014). Thus, talent management is a widely accepted phenomenon, and companies are working towards attracting development and retaining talent for an assured organisational sustainable success (Schuler et al., 2011). The contextualisation of talent management, communication of talent, and practical strategies is essential for its growth.

Talent management is a critical component of company growth. It allows attracting top talent, motivating employees, ensuring continuous coverage of pertinent roles, increasing employee performance, and retaining client satisfaction. Given that investing in talent management enhances company growth and excellence, Pearson PLC is working on implementation strategies (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017 p. 432). Companies worldwide are working on the critical issue of attracting, developing, and retaining talent (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017). Thus talent management is the activity and process that fosters identification, development engagement, systematic attraction, retention, and deployment of talent that add value to the organisation’s sustainable success (Vaiman et al., 2012). The complexities of the current business context marked by technology, globalisation, more comprehensive socio-economic, demographic, and geopolitical transformations- further enhance the necessity to focus on recruiting, developing, attracting, and identifying talents capable of overcoming the challenges.

The recent focus on talent management orient towards strategic priority for income generation for organisations. Research conducted concerns the theoretical development of talent management (Schuler et al., 2011). The need for talent management arises from people management practices aimed at achieving operational excellence and strategic execution. Talents are unique and central to attain a sustainable competitive advantage. Hence organisation’s talent management to grasp, leverage, and protect their resources. Therefore, most CEOs’ talent-related issue is a concern (sparrow et al., 2014, p. 1)Over 80% of the CEO point to the scarcity of essential skills and capability as a threat to its growth, hence addressing practical questions concerning talent management.

The critiques to talent management research linked it to delay in achieving the organisation’s direction and vision. Yet, recently talent management is the fastest growing faculty in the management fields. Consequently, the question that arises targets what happens in practice and why (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017). Without a doubt, insufficient knowledge on the conception, implementation, and development of talent management affects organisational outcomes (Schuler et al., 2011). Evidence points out that talent management design and implementation are rational and critical processes from organisational context and interrelated factors. In a recent review, authors based their research in a broad context on conceptualisation and talent management implementation as highly neglected (Cappelli and Keller, 2014, p. 306). Therefore, there is a need for critiques to address the challenges and critical factors of the future.

Practical Aspects of Talent Management Accountabilities

 to best address the research question on how best to meet the practical aspect of talent management. A framework that accounts for the systematic variations and an in-depth understanding of talent management conceptual borders is key. Krishnan and Scullion (2017), in addressing the research question, a deep understanding of talent definition, and the activities surrounding talent management are critical (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017). Overall, offering a solid base upon which investigation of the different talent management leads to a deeper contextual understanding.

Even though literature works have focused on a candid distinction between the exclusive and the inclusive approaches of talent management, lately, the focus is on the relationship between talent definitions and talent management practice. The configuring of talent management has drawn from the works of Cappelli and Keller (2014), who concentrate on the varied types of organisations, the studies conducted, and the contribution of talent management to the organisation.

First, the framework for identifying the different types of talent management takes a wider scope. The initial dimension entails subjective and objective approaches. The subjective view defines the individualistic characteristic that includes knowledge and abilities. The objective approach addresses talent management regarding whether its inclusive or exclusive subsets of the employee’s desires in talent management (Vaiman et al., 2012). The last dimension focuses on whether talent management Is innate -acquired in that it is a natural ability or an adopted subset.

Thus the conceptual ground of talent management relies on developing a framework that addresses a comparative analysis to derive a befitting talent management framework that works (Schuler et al., 2011).  Future studies should explore questions regarding the context, how common talent management is, and contextual factors such as time, size, industry, and culture.  Further, a limited sample size of the current studies enabled a deeper understanding of the various factors that affect talent management (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017). A future depth examination of the realised outcomes will shed light on factors that affect talent management, including retention and employee performance.

Critical analysis of the concept of talent management

            The five talent management frameworks encompass talent identification, recruitment, development, career management, retention management, and succession planning. Where talent management in the context of recruitment encompasses activities that identify and hire talented external candidates. When the reliance on recruitment is high, the organisation tends to buy talented individual s from the market into positions. When it is low, the company relies on recruitment at the entry-level (Schuler et al., 2011).  The application of formal procedures, where the specific talent definition and assessment policies apply, leads to success. Further, validated assessment tools with methodological standards can inform the decision making process and a holistic understanding.

The second phase encompasses talent identification, where regular talent reviews are outlined to create talent pools. The reviews can be through succession planning or informal methods. Talent identification determines input or output-based assessment that concerns what employees have achieved and its measurable outcomes such as cultural fitness and motivation.

The third aspect is talent development, where activities that nurture talent that is program-based apply through formal learning methods. Or are experience-based. In this case, activities can be exclusive and or inclusive (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017). The exclusivity encompasses engaging in challenging assignments and rotations and is activity-based. Inclusive programs offer learning opportunities in the sense of organisation and talent pool. Some organisations concentrate on talent as a group to develop together and organise activities for the said course.

The fourth practice encompasses succession planning and career management activities that ensure that the organisation utilises the available human resource optimally and facilitate its flow into the right jobs (Vaiman et al., 2012). The focus is on the prioritisation of organisational needs and upward mobility in career practices. The organisation here focuses on its staff members’ needs and responsibilities and limits boundaries as it encourages flexibility in self-direction (Krishnan and Scullion, 2017). instead, the organisation draws alternative paths to promote career development.

The final aspect of talent management practice entails retention management, where the activities are applied to prevent employee turnover. The initial dimension here concerns the employer as a brand and focuses on efforts to differentiate individual employees’ unique aspect that appeals to talent (Schuler et al., 2011). With these dimensions in place, the organisation can deploy specific measures to enhance loyalty.

 

 

 

Chapter 6: Conclusion

An organisation’s success rests in its ability to manage the available talent and resources within its reach. Although the findings of this paper reveal that a substantial number organisation has specific talent management strategies prioritised there is a variance in the levels of quality and success of the strategies laid out. Thus, more outcome-driven practices help set the organisation apart and implement talent management strategies. Pearson PLC is an example of an organisation that has realised the potential of talent management. Successful organisations ensure that they develop formal policies and procedures that identify talent that meet management needs. Thus, integrated management needs to incorporate HR’s role in managing talent initiative within the organisation and extending it to all employees.

Overall, employees align with the company’s mission, culture, values, and mission if it aligns with their personal goals and values. Therefore, the Pearson Plc theme of talent management should showcase a paradigm shift from the first impression into addressing employee-centric talent management regarding an employee as a brand that influences the corporate brand reputation.  Thus, for Pearson plc, finding and attracting talent is an ongoing process. The human resource is a key personal and should optimise the recruitment by building continuous pipelines of talent.  This can be through adding up the high-quality unsuccessful candidate into the talent pool’s connection with qualified, pre-screened applicants for future roles, thus improving the potential employee experience.

Recommendations

According to Hartmann (2014), the top ten most important topics for the future are talent management and tare key in making the difference in effective human resource management. The concern is on the disparities between talent management in international organisations and small business enterprises. Vaiman et al. (2017) suggests that size matters in the implementation of talent management in that small organisations tend to focus on activities while large organisations focus on operation. The small organisations are oriented towards administration and tend to ignore talent management and drive their operations on intuition. Whereas, corporate implement the activities at a slightly higher rate.

Other organisations attribute talent with values, potential, ambitions, and potential, which is a fraction of what is needed in talent management. Open communication renders a successful function in talent management. Through an effective strategy, this can be fully implemented. Consequently, it is possible to create individualised activities that align with talent management.

Critical Reflection of Methodology

The study used a longitudinal explorative study to conduct an in-depth exploration of practices aligned with talent management in Pearson PLC compared to mature organisations on a global scale and develop a talent management framework for Pearson PLC. The methodology led to the collection and analysis of data aligned with the purpose of the study. The methodology was suitable for the study because it enabled the in-depth study of the concept of talent management. It was also cost-effective and not time-consuming as it involved a review of existing literature. However, the methodology also had its drawbacks. For instance, since it involved a review of existing literature, the results of the study may be biased to the authors of the literature. Additionally, the methodology did not involve the collection of primary data from the employees or management of Pearson PLC about the organisation’s talent management strategies which may have limited its accuracy. Nonetheless, the methodology was generally useful in the context of the study as well as in meeting the objectives of the study and answering the research questions. This is because its strengths outweighed its limitations with regards to the needs of the study.

 

 

References

Cappelli, P. And Keller, J.R., 2014. Talent management: conceptual approaches and practical challenges. Annu. Rev. Organ. Psychol. Org. Behav.1(1), pp.305-331.

Collings, D.G., 2014. Integrating global mobility and global talent management: exploring the challenges and strategic opportunities. Journal of world business49(2), pp.253-261.

Hartmann, E., Feisel, E. And Schober, H., 2010. Talent management of western MNCs in china: balancing global integration and local responsiveness. Journal of world business45(2), pp.169-178.

Kim, Y., Williams, R., Rothwell, W.J. and Penaloza, p., 2014. A strategic model for technical talent management: a model based on a qualitative case study. Performance improvement quarterly26(4), pp.93-121.

Krishnan, T.N. and Scullion, H., 2017. Talent management and dynamic view of talent in small and medium enterprises. Human resource management review27(3), pp.431-441.

Schuler, R.S., Jackson, S.E., and Tarique, I., 2011. Global talent management and global talent challenges: strategic opportunities for HR. Journal of world business46(4), pp.506-516.

Silzer, R. and Dowell, B.E., 2010. Strategic talent management matters. Strategy-driven talent management: a leadership imperative, pp.3-72.

Sparrow, P., Scullion, H. and Tarique, I. Eds., 2014. Strategic talent management: contemporary issues in an international context. Cambridge university press.

Vaiman, V., Scullion, H. and Collings, D., 2012. Talent management decision making. Management decision.

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By placing an order with us, you agree to the service we provide. We will endear to do all that it takes to deliver a comprehensive paper as per your requirements. We also count on your cooperation to ensure that we deliver on this mandate.

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550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
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