I need a discussion done for week 10 and a response to 2 other classmates for my Leading change by putting people first

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 556 (1196) Page 1 of 7

JWI 556

Leading Change by Putting People First

Week Ten Lecture Notes

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 556 (1196) Page 2 of 7

SUSTAINING THE CHANGE AND KEEPING PEOPLE FIRST

What It Means

Change is about innovation and growth, and if you’re going to keep on winning, it’s never done.

Successful change leaders are those who can build a culture that embraces change as a way of life

rather than viewing it as an ordeal that has to be survived. If you truly believe that people are the most

important part of any organization, then you should welcome your role as a leader who helps to build an

organization committed to putting people first.

Why It Matters

 If you lose sight of the forces that undermine a people-first approach to change, you undermine

your organization’s ability to attract, develop, and retain the best and brightest.

 Committing to finding a better way every day is the only path to building a sustainable competitive

advantage.

 Continuing your own professional growth is the best move you can make to help others and to

build the HR leadership role you and your employer deserve.

“If you’re going to win, and keep on

winning, you have to recognize that

change is continuous and is never done.”

Jack Welch

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 556 (1196) Page 3 of 7

FORCES THAT UNDERMINE A “PEOPLE FIRST” APPROACH

TO LEADING CHANGE

As noted in a previous course, “building a powerful workforce of smart, talented, and engaged people is a

never-ending journey. You don’t get to sit back (at least not for long) and bask in the glory of what you

have done” (JWI 522).

To keep up with the transformations that organizations need to undergo, we must develop leaders who

embrace change AND understand that the only way to lead meaningful change is through putting people

first. This is a point that draws us back to Kotter’s distinction between management and leadership:

“Because management deals mostly with the status quo and leadership deals mostly with

change, in the next century we will have to become much more skilled at creating

leaders. Without enough leaders, the vision, communication, and empowerment that are

at the heart of transformation will simply not happen well enough or fast enough to satisfy

our needs and expectations.”

Leading Change, p. 173

These new change leaders must have a vision and the ability to predict the future; they must have a

special capacity to anticipate the radically unexpected. They must be driven to empower their people to

do more and be their best.

“Many of the same kinds of organizational attributes required to develop leadership are

also needed to empower employees. Those facilitating factors would include flatter

hierarchies, less bureaucracy, and a greater willingness to take risks. In addition,

constant empowerment for a constantly changing world works best in organizations in

which senior managers focus on leadership and in which they delegate most managerial

responsibilities to lower levels.”

Leading Change, p. 175

While doing this, however, change leaders can’t be blind to the forces that undermine a “people first”

approach. These forces include, but are not limited to:

 Greed – not paying people what they are worth or giving them opportunities to grow

 Being more comfortable in the role of a manager barking orders than in leadership inviting others

to forge the future with you

 Lack of vision – inability to see what’s coming and to inspire others to meet the future head on

 Failure to elevate HR to a position of prominence in the C-Suite

 Not understanding that people are the most important part of any organization and not getting

every brain in the game

 Hiding behind complex org charts and bureaucracies that impede communication and the free

flow of ideas

 Being too busy managing the day-to-day grind to engage others in the joy of building a winning

organization

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 556 (1196) Page 4 of 7

BUILDING A CULTURE THAT EMBRACES FINDING A BETTER WAY EVERY DAY

“Truly adaptive firms with adaptive cultures are awesome competitive machines. They

produce superb products and services faster and better. They run circles around bloated

bureaucracies. Even when they have far fewer resources and patents or less market

share, they compete and win again and again.”

Leading Change, p. 180

As an HR leader, you and your team have a critical role to play in developing this culture. You can work

with business-unit leaders to help them set up Work-Out sessions to find better ways to get business

done. You can work with finance departments to find better ways to reward people who deliver cost

saving and revenue increasing wins. You can help all managers and leaders deliver more effective

performance feedback and talent development to their teams. You can help those leaders define the

winning behaviors that can be observed, communicated, taught, measured, and rewarded.

While an organization can learn and accomplish a lot over the course of a single major change effort,

one-off events are rarely enough for new behaviors to take hold in a sustainable way. It’s just not enough

for people throughout the organization to deeply learn the skills and mindsets needed to drive change.

And it is certainly not enough to keep up in today’s rapidly shifting business environment.

The work of change leaders is not just to navigate their organizations through a major change. It is also to

identify, lead, and embed change after change after change to create an organization that is innovative,

flexible, and forward-looking – one that never stops learning.

Kotter says that if the rate of external change continues to climb, then the urgency rate of the winning

twenty-first-century organization will have to be medium to high all the time. The twentieth-century model

of lengthy periods of calm or complacency being punctuated by shorter periods of hectic activity will not

work. A higher rate of urgency does not imply ever-present panic, anxiety, or fear. It means a state in

which complacency is virtually absent, in which people are always looking for both problems and

opportunities, and in which the norm is “do it now.”

“Typical employees in typical firms today still receive little data on their performance, the

performance of their group or department, and the performance of the firm.

To both create these systems and use their output productively, corporate cultures in the

twenty-first century will have to value candid discussions far more than they do today.

Norms associated with political politeness, with nonconformational diplomaticese, and

with killing-the-messenger-of bad-news will have to change. The volume knob on the

dishonest dialog channel will have to be turned way down.”

“The combination of valid data from a number of external sources, broad communication

of that information inside an organization, and a willingness to deal honestly with the

feedback will go a long way toward squashing complacency.”

Leading Change, pp. 170-171

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 556 (1196) Page 5 of 7

LEVERAGING WHAT YOU HAVE LEARNED ABOUT LEADING CHANGE

TO CONTINUE GROWING IN YOUR CAREER

Kotter asserts that lifelong learning, a trait once seen in relatively few people, is the hallmark of the most

successful leaders. “Instead of slowing down and peaking at age thirty-five or forty-five, they keep

learning at a rate we normally associate only with children and young adults,” he writes (p. 185). It used

to be that most people learned all they needed to know by the time they were fifteen. Today, not only

does it take longer, but the realities are changing so quickly that many of our old behaviors and

assumptions become outdated.

“As the rate of change increases, the willingness and ability to keep developing become

central to career success for individuals and to economic success for organizations.

[People] win…because they outgrow their rivals. They develop the capacity to handle a

complex and changing business environment. They grow to become unusually

competent in advancing organizational transformation. They learn to be leaders.”

Leading Change, p. 186

The world’s increasing complexity calls for multifaceted change leaders with a variety of experiences and a

depth of judgment. This richness takes time to develop. People who prioritize learning and growth have

more to bring to the table at age 50 or 70 than they had at 30. Kotter encourages us to understand that the

power of compounded growth applies just as surely to people as it does to money. Looking at two people –

one who grows by 1% every year and the other who grows by 6% – he concluded that “[p]eers at age

thirty…will be in totally different leagues at age fifty” (p. 190). One will be gathering strength, experience,

power, and depth. The other risks becoming increasingly irrelevant, at least as a change leader.

One of the keys to such continuous learning that he doesn’t mention is following your interests and

passions to find, in Jack’s terms, your Area of Destiny. Even passions that seem unrelated to your job are

valuable to the lifelong learner. They offer new avenues for development and mastery, and they often

provide a lens for seeing business challenges and opportunities in new and creative ways.

“People who learn to master more volatile career paths also usually become more

comfortable with change generally and thus better able to play more useful roles in

organizational transformations. They more easily develop whatever leadership potential

they have. With more leadership, they are in a better position to help their employers

advance the transformation process so as to significantly improve meaningful results

while minimizing the painful effects of change.”

Leading Change, p. 193

THE PERSONAL QUALITIES OF CHANGE LEADERS

Strong HR leaders can step up when required and help bring an organization through a big change event

like a restructuring or an acquisition integration. It will take all their best efforts, perhaps over a period of

years, but they can do it. Fewer, however, are comfortable in the world of continuous transformation

where one major change initiative succeeds another.

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 556 (1196) Page 6 of 7

These rare change agents are restless and curious, always looking for ways to get better. They love a

good challenge. They are at home with high levels of uncertainty. Their passion, enthusiasm, and

conviction are infectious. They are true lifelong learners who possess the following characteristics:

1. Risk Taking: a willingness to push oneself out of comfort zones

2. Humble Self-Reflection: honest assessment of successes and failures, especially the latter

3. Solicitation of Opinions: aggressive collection of information and ideas from others

4. Careful Listening: propensity to listen to others

5. Openness to New Ideas: willingness to view life with an open mind

Leading Change, p. 191

When organizations improve, many people win. Employees enjoy the intrinsic satisfactions of success,

productivity, and creativity, as well as a better reputation and greater compensation. Consumers get more

innovative products and services at better prices. Communities prosper. Many of these benefits come

thanks to change agents – those people with the vision and courage to improve business and the skills to

see their vision through.

“A strategy of embracing the past will probably become increasingly ineffective over the

next few decades. Better for most of us to start learning now how to cope with change, to

develop whatever leadership potential we have, and to help our organizations in the

transformation process. Better for most of us, despite the risks, to leap into the future.

And to do so sooner rather than later.”

Leading Change, p. 194

It is our hope that through taking this course, you have strengthened your understanding of what it takes

to lead meaningful change, and that you have come away with a new set of tools you can put to work as

you lead your next change initiative. We wish you all the best in continuing your career growth to become

a truly great agent of change who puts people first.

“Good people never think they’ve reached the top of their game…

but they’re dying to get there.”

Jack Welch

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 556 (1196) Page 7 of 7

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF THIS WEEK’S CLASS

As you read the materials and participate in class activities, stay focused on the key learning outcomes

for the week:

 Review the forces that undermine a “people first” approach to leading change

Based on everything we have covered in this course, take time to reflect on the extent to which

your organization demonstrates a commitment to putting people first. If they do, that’s great. If

not, then you have opportunities to guide the steps that can lead to change. That change is not

going to happen overnight, and without the support of senior leadership, it may never happen

across the entire organization. But that shouldn’t stop you from making things better in the areas

where you can. This may be only in in your team at first, but if you can create the kind of culture

within that team that empowers people to be their best, others will see what you’re doing and will

want to emulate it. Pretty soon, you just may find yourself starting a movement.

 Examine ways to build a culture that embraces finding a better way every day

Look for tensions that exist between the desire to drive innovation and change, and the desire for

stability and predictability in the operation of the business. Address these through the regular

sharing of economic, technical and market information. Engage your teams(s) in keeping their

eyes and ears open for threats and opportunities that could impact the business. Build a level of

heathy anxiety that encourages everyone to ask – what’s next? Done in the right way, this will

foster a culture where people are more engaged in the business and welcomes the challenge to

do bigger and better things that keep the company winning.

 Leverage what you have learned about leading change to continue growing in your career

Find your Area of Destiny, and never stop learning and growing. Turn your job into something

that energizes you and fulfills your passions, and you’ll never “work” another day in your life!

Order a unique copy of this paper
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

We value our customers and so we ensure that what we do is 100% original..
With us you are guaranteed of quality work done by our qualified experts.Your information and everything that you do with us is kept completely confidential.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

The Product ordered is guaranteed to be original. Orders are checked by the most advanced anti-plagiarism software in the market to assure that the Product is 100% original. The Company has a zero tolerance policy for plagiarism.

Read more

Free-revision policy

The Free Revision policy is a courtesy service that the Company provides to help ensure Customer’s total satisfaction with the completed Order. To receive free revision the Company requires that the Customer provide the request within fourteen (14) days from the first completion date and within a period of thirty (30) days for dissertations.

Read more

Privacy policy

The Company is committed to protect the privacy of the Customer and it will never resell or share any of Customer’s personal information, including credit card data, with any third party. All the online transactions are processed through the secure and reliable online payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By placing an order with us, you agree to the service we provide. We will endear to do all that it takes to deliver a comprehensive paper as per your requirements. We also count on your cooperation to ensure that we deliver on this mandate.

Read more

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency

Order your paper today and save 15% with the discount code HAPPY

X
error: Content is protected !!
Open chat
1
You can contact our live agent via WhatsApp! Via + 1 323 412 5597

Feel free to ask questions, clarifications, or discounts available when placing an order.